Panic at the Church: The Use of Frames, Social Problems, And Moral Panics in the Formation of an AIDS Social Movement Organization (Report) - The Western Journal of Black Studies

Panic at the Church: The Use of Frames, Social Problems, And Moral Panics in the Formation of an AIDS Social Movement Organization (Report)

By The Western Journal of Black Studies

  • Release Date - Published: 2010-09-22
  • Book Genre: Social Science
  • Author: The Western Journal of Black Studies
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Panic at the Church: The Use of Frames, Social Problems, And Moral Panics in the Formation of an AIDS Social Movement Organization (Report) The Western Journal of Black Studies read online review & book description:

Introduction How are moral panics created by a health social movement organization in order to address a social problem after it has already been framed for its target audience? For decades, health social movements have fought for funding, increased research, and awareness for a variety of health concerns. This article is a case study that explores the role that The Balm in Gilead, a non-profit organization that promotes AIDS awareness to the Black Church, has played in the formation of a health social movement among Black churches in New York City. In this article, The Balm in Gilead serves as the paradigm for examining the strategies used in creating a health social movement organization that targets religious institutions. This research posits that because of the often taboo routes of HIV transmission, the resulting stigmas associated with AIDS requires the utilization of unique tactics in order to organize a health social movement targeting Black religious institutions (The term "Black" will be used throughout this paper to refer to people of African descent. I understand that the term "African American" is a distinct ethnic group used to describe Blacks who live in the United States. However, there are a large number of Blacks who live in the U.S., and specifically, New York City (the research location) who do not identify as Black. As such, Black will be used to refer to people of African descent, whether or not they reside in the U.S.). Using data collected from 28 one-on-one interviews, this project examines the founding of The Balm in Gilead as a health social movement organization and explores how HIV/AIDS was created as a social problem among Black religious institutions through the use of moral panics.

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