The International Criminal Court and the Political Economy of Antitreaty Discourse. (Symposim on Treaties, Enforcement, And U.S. Sovereignty) - Stanford Law School

The International Criminal Court and the Political Economy of Antitreaty Discourse. (Symposim on Treaties, Enforcement, And U.S. Sovereignty)

By Stanford Law School

  • Release Date - Published: 2003-05-01
  • Book Genre: Law
  • Author: Stanford Law School
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The International Criminal Court and the Political Economy of Antitreaty Discourse. (Symposim on Treaties, Enforcement, And U.S. Sovereignty) Stanford Law School read online review & book description:

INTRODUCTION When a nation state ratifies a treaty to extradite criminals, safeguard natural resources in international waters, or provide for common defense, it places some constraints on its sovereignty by committing to do something for other nations. (1) Presumably, whether those constraints are worth accepting depends on the circumstances in which the nation finds itself, the legal and political impact of ratifying the treaty, and the consequences of rejecting the treaty and retaining a fuller measure of unshackled sovereignty. (2) It all sounds simple enough, except for the devilish detail that a nation state is not an "it" but a "they." (3) Accept this fact and it becomes less clear what it means to say that new treaty obligations might be "worth accepting depending on the circumstances in which the nation state finds itself," because it is less clear who exactly the nation state is, and how exactly its constituent parts should evaluate a prospective treaty.

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