The End Is Near and It's Going to Be Awesome - Kevin D. Williamson

The End Is Near and It's Going to Be Awesome

By Kevin D. Williamson

  • Release Date - Published: 2013-05-07
  • Book Genre: Public Administration
  • Author: Kevin D. Williamson
Our rating: 5/5 stars

4 Score: 4 (From 20 Ratings)

The End Is Near and It's Going to Be Awesome Kevin D. Williamson read online review & book description:

In The End Is Near and It’s Going to Be Awesome, Kevin Williamson, a National Review Online contributor, makes the bold argument that the United States government is disintegrating—and that it is a good thing!

Williamson offers a radical re-envisioning of government, a powerful analysis of why it doesn’t work, and an exploration of the innovative solutions to various social problems that are spontaneously emerging as a result of the failure of politics and government.

Critical and compelling, The End Is Near and It’s Going to Be Awesome: How Going Broke Will Leave America Richer, Happier, and More Secure lays out a thoughtful plan for a new system, one based on success stories from around the country, from those who home-school their children to others who have successfully created their own currency.

The End Is Near and It's Going to Be Awesome book review The End Is Near and It's Going to Be Awesome ePUB; Kevin D. Williamson; Public Administration books.

Posted Reviews

  • Awesome read.

    5
    By ryan3164
    One of the best political books I have ever read. Offers real solutions without partisan finger pointing.
  • An excellent book!!

    5
    By Discerning Reader
    Very well written
  • Worthwhile and thought provoking

    4
    By me2earth
    Many useful insights to be found herein. I strongly suggest reading Ferguson's book, "Civilization" to fill in some gaps in the thesis here (the "Killer Apps" concept offers a better explanation for why things have ended up as they are than what Williamson gleens). Some of the material warrants skepticism of the sort one should reserve for common libertarian arguments that rely on oversimplifications or excising of readily available common facts to build their too–good–be–true conclusions (particularly weak on foreign affairs and jurisprudence as usual, but even here he makes many fine points). Libertarians can be so naive about the way reality actually works sometimes! In spite of these few shortcomings, Williamson makes a credible case, that although the coming modes of collapse may be very disruptive, there is reason to be optimistic we will end up better for it. I still fear that he and others are right that the passage from one paradigm to another could take enough decades that I will not live to see it through but hope for a quicker and more decisive resolution. Sometimes evolution is slow, sometimes it is revolutionary!

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