Give Me Everything You Have - James Lasdun

Give Me Everything You Have

By James Lasdun

  • Release Date - Published: 2013-02-12
  • Book Genre: Biographies & Memoirs
  • Author: James Lasdun
Our rating: 5/5 stars

3 Score: 3 (From 44 Ratings)

Give Me Everything You Have James Lasdun read online review & book description:

A true story of obsessive love turning to obsessive hate, Give Me Everything You Have chronicles the author's strange and harrowing ordeal at the hands of a former student, a self-styled "verbal terrorist," who began trying, in her words, to "ruin him." Hate mail, online postings, and public accusations of plagiarism and sexual misconduct were her weapons of choice and, as with more conventional terrorist weapons, proved remarkably difficult to combat. James Lasdun's account, while terrifying, is told with compassion and humor, and brilliantly succeeds in turning a highly personal story into a profound meditation on subjects as varied as madness, race, Middle East politics, and the meaning of honor and reputation in the Internet age.

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Give Me Everything You Have book review Give Me Everything You Have ePUB; James Lasdun; Biographies & Memoirs books.

Posted Reviews

  • Moth to the flame?

    4
    By Jobar_12
    If you measure a book by the number of lines you want to read again, you should enjoy this one. The author recounts being stalked on the Internet for several years. By a female student, Nasreen. The story is almost continuously interesting. There are puzzles. His wife's reaction is a big one for me. He says she told him "not to break off contact with her, or not too abruptly.” The author explores and fine-tunes rationale after rationale for his actions all through the book. However, at this critical point, he adopts his wife's approach without a moment to explain why stringing things out made sense. I found myself wondering why the author, very early on, did not do what his associate (Paula) did. Paula composed a compassionate final response and then never responded to Nasreen again. Yes, the compassionate final response provoked a "torrent of outstandingly vicious" responses from Nasreen. The author doesn't say (what I suspect) that Nasreen essentially left Paula alone after that. Regardless, the circumstances screamed for a response like Paula's, but the author ruled it out. His story would have been more interesting had he tried that approach and failed, but if he succeeded? The story gets a big setback. As the months went on, Nasreen escalated from e-mails to many other forms of attack permitted by the Internet. The author's recount of all this is interesting stuff. I was also puzzled by the extremes he goes to explain why he doesn't think the stalker is mentally unbalanced, as she clearly is: “Even as I write this, though, I am aware of the possibility of mixed motives in what I myself am doing. I have a strong vested interest, after all, in claiming that Nasreen was fundamentally sane. ... As soon as you reduce human behavior to a pathology—label it “psychotic” or “sociopathic,” or attribute it to some kind of personality disorder—it becomes, for literary purposes, less interesting (at least to me).” Really? In the end, the story had an enjoyable "moth to the flame" feel to it. Writers need stories and here comes one in real life, rough edges and all. Most of us would be looking for the quickest way out. But the author is a writer and writers need stories. How then to build the story into a book-length product? Other reviewers seem put off by the author's digressions, but I wasn't. It seems a typical human reaction to want to place one's life's experiences in some large, enduring narrative. In the end I found myself wondering whether the author welcomed the encounters. He suggests as much. Among his many runs at analyzing the circumstances, he talks about being drawn to stories “of a man seeking his own destruction.” I'm looking forward to more of his work.
  • Update your website.... We want to know!

    3
    By Jamie Schultz
    Well written. I enjoyed the story. I couldn't imagine going through any of it. Especially when integrity is called into question. Will there be a sequel? Will you update your website? I skipped a few parts as well. As there may have been reference to feelings etc. that seemed to go off on a tangent of books that were written during this ordeal. At first I thought I purchased a book of short stories. I just wanted to know what happened to the writer and what happened to "Nazreen". I'm not sure my opinion matters as this is the first book I've read in many years. I Enjoyed the comparisons on the last few pages.
  • Tough to get through

    1
    By H-A-C
    Boooooring and super wordy. I skipped to the end to find out what happens and was disappointed to find it extremely anticlimactic.
  • Curious

    4
    By Chiqui1415
    I really liked this book. Too bad it had to be a real story because going through all that must have been awful. But it would have been great to know what happened in the end with "Nasreen". Did she get arrested? Did she she stop the harrassing? What happened to her??
  • Fantastic

    5
    By Harborough808
    How do you deal with a stalker made of ones and zeroes, an ephemeral foe? Confronted by an unsolvable problem, how do you find resolution? After reading this story, I am thinking about what it means to have an online reputation and how that can be so easily and anonymously damaged on the internet. The middle chapters were hard to read, when the author was coming undone with the stress of his stalker's Internet reach. I found myself cheering when his focus returned to family and work and the trip to Jerusalem. An engaging read. I highly recommend it.

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